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Entertainment Events

The Florence Events Center is the heart and soul of the city’s community life, annually hosting events ranging from ballet to the blues. It is home to the Last Resort Players theater company, as well as Seacoast Entertainment Association’s annual concert series.





  • Sat, Sep 20th 12:00pm - 9:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    The Florence Dance Festival’s theme for 2014 is “Fine Your Groove. It’s happening on Saturday, September 20 from noon to 9 p.m.

    Featured at the event will be the Misty Mountain Cloggers, hula groups from Eugene and Florence, and a ballroom group from Coos Bay, among others.

    Swing to a fancy fox trot, or sway to a sexy hula. There’s definitely something to interest every kind of dancer at this annual event. The festival will feature daytime workshops and an evening performance at 7 p.m. A variety of dance styles will be featured throughout the day including clogging, hula, Zumba, ballroom, swing, and line dance.

    “Dance for your health,” says Festival organizer Pat Wheeler. “The benefits abound. You’ll meet new people, and you don’t need a partner to participate. Come join the fun!”

  • Fri, Sep 26th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    The Florence Festival of Books, which opens at 10 a.m. on Saturday, September 27, has added a special event on Friday, September 26. Best-selling author Teresa Rhyne will appear in the theater at 7 p.m. Teresa will have a meet and greet and book signing open to the public at 6 p.m. in the lobby. Tickets for the event are $5 in advance and $7 at the door. Proceeds from the ticket sales will be divided between the Florence Area Humane Society and Florence Relay for Life.

    Teresa describes herself as a lawyer, writer, dog lover and breast cancer survivor (though definitely not in that order). She loves wine, books, coffee and dogs (still not in order) and loathes exercise, Christmas, and chocolate (probably in that order).

    Teresa travels internationally for keynote speeches and other presentations wherever an inspirational, humorous, cancer-surviving, dog-loving, pessimist-turned-reluctant-optimist, motivational speaker may be needed.

  • Thu, Oct 2nd 4:00pm

    The popular Taste of Home Cooking School returns to Florence with cooking demonstrations, samples, prizes and more.

  • Sat, Oct 4th 8:00am - 8:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    A four-year tradition that began at the Florence Elks Lodge continues this year with the Oktoberfest coming to the Florence Events Center, on Saturday, October 4. 

    Starting with a pancake breakfast served up by the Florence Kiwanis Club, followed by wiener dog races and wrapping up with an afternoon of authentic German food, bier and music, it is sure to hold something for everyone who attends.

    This year, several community non-profit groups will be providing the German-themed food fair, including Boys & Girls Club of Western Lane County, Florence Regional Arts Alliance, Florence Food Share, Friends of the FEC and more. Authentic German music will be played throughout the entire event performed by a variety of local and regional artists. And of course, there’s the German beer!

    For extra entertainment ‘puppy-mutual’ betting is being added to the wiener dog races, as well as other activities to entertain the whole family.

    “So dig out your lederhosen, grab a mug, meet old friends you’ve never seen before and join us!  “Gemutlichkeit!” says Chamber of Commerce Director Cal Applebee.

  • Mon, Oct 6th 7:00pm

    Hear the high school musicians perform in their first concert of the year.

  • Sat, Oct 11th 1:30pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    The Emerald City Jazz Kings will open their 2014-15 season at the FEC on Saturday, October 11 with a matinee performance at 1:30 p.m. The concert features many of the original numbers recorded by Frank Sinatra and Count Basie in the 1960s.

    Frank Sinatra and Count Basie connoisseurs, two albums which cannot pass by without mention came from a few evenings of live recording in January and February of 1966 in the Copa Room at the Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. Sinatra was headlining that week, with the Basie orchestra opening and backing him up. With music conducted and arranged by Quincy Jones, these star-studded evenings led to many definitive versions of songs readily associated with Frank and the Basie Orchestra.

  • Sun, Oct 12th 1:15pm
  • Sun, Oct 26th 2:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    After a successful worldwide premiere at the Newport Performing Arts Center and a reprise command performance in Yachats two weeks later, the cast and band of She Loves Me Not are "taking it on the road."

    There will be a matinee performance at the Florence Events Center on Sunday, October 26 at 2 p.m.

    She Loves Me Not is a musical comedy, with book, music and lyrics by the Oregon Coast's own Milo Graamans. Director Carl Miller presented Milo's original work as a reader's theater musical, a stylistic first for this area. The script features warm and witty dialog, approachable and honest characters, and the music is filled with catchy melodies, harmonies and some surprises along the way.

    Finding time for a road show that accommodates 15 different personal schedules won't be easy, Miller says. “For now, we'll just call it a smash success, and no doubt a memorable experience for the 700+ people who attended the four-show run in Newport.”

    Florence theatre-goers, prepare to be happily surprised!

     

     

  • Repeats every day until Sat Nov 08 2014 .
    Fri, Nov 7th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Sat, Nov 8th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”