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Entertainment Events

The Florence Events Center is the heart and soul of the city’s community life, annually hosting events ranging from ballet to the blues. It is home to the Last Resort Players theater company, as well as Seacoast Entertainment Association’s annual concert series.





  • Sun, Oct 26th 2:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    After a successful worldwide premiere at the Newport Performing Arts Center and a reprise command performance in Yachats two weeks later, the cast and band of She Loves Me Not are "taking it on the road."

    There will be a matinee performance at the Florence Events Center on Sunday, October 26 at 2 p.m.

    She Loves Me Not is a musical comedy, with book, music and lyrics by the Oregon Coast's own Milo Graamans. Director Carl Miller presented Milo's original work as a reader's theater musical, a stylistic first for this area. The script features warm and witty dialog, approachable and honest characters, and the music is filled with catchy melodies, harmonies and some surprises along the way.

    Finding time for a road show that accommodates 15 different personal schedules won't be easy, Miller says. “For now, we'll just call it a smash success, and no doubt a memorable experience for the 700+ people who attended the four-show run in Newport.”

    Florence theatre-goers, prepare to be happily surprised!

     

     

  • Repeats every day until Sat Nov 08 2014 .
    Fri, Nov 7th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Sat, Nov 8th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Repeats every week until Sun Nov 16 2014 .
    Sun, Nov 9th 2:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Repeats every day until Sat Nov 15 2014 .
    Fri, Nov 14th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Sat, Nov 15th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Sun, Nov 16th 2:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    Les Miserables: Is It or Isn’t It Opera?

    Les Miserables has the history in the theater industry of being called a mega-musical. What that means is that the vocals, chorus, orchestra, sets, lighting, sound, costumes and special effects are as powerful, emotional and over the top as you can possibly get. But, to answer the question, it is actual opera.

    The challenge with referring to Les Mis as “opera” is that many audiences are turned off by opera. People often think of Wagner, Verdi, Mozart or Puccini when they hear the word opera. Les Mis is opera because of the way Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil wrote the music. In creating the music, they use specific themes to convey specific emotions.

    For example, when Valjean - the principal hero, played by John Pohlman – sings “What Have I Done?” in the Prologue, he is singing an emotional epiphany, a realization that his life has been rescued and completely changed by the powerful purchase of his soul for God.

    In the auditions and in recruiting singers for Les Mis, the directors--Leah Goodwin and Laura Merz--looked specifically for singers with classical training. There is no pop singing in this show. They wanted singers who had experience, big ranges, and were able to convey the emotions needed for this unusual show. 

    “We wanted to bring a new experience to Florence theater-goers,” Merz says. “When potential auditioners questioned us about what we were looking for, we simply said, ‘passion.’”

    As in opera, this story is sung-through. There are no long scene changes. The audience will not have to sit through the frequent orchestra vamps as they have in the past. There is very little dialogue; Les Mis is 97% sung. The story is told through solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, chorus and recitative – all aspects of opera.

    “Our orchestra is the best,” Merz believes. “I’m extremely proud of all the players. We have four brass, four woodwinds, two keyboardists, an acoustic bass player and percussionist. All thirteen of us have our work cut out for us, but the music of Les Mis is so incredibly fabulous that it is, without a doubt, a work of joy.”

  • Wed, Nov 19th 7:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    This memorable holiday extravaganza once again fills the stage with smiling faces of all ages as hundreds of young dancers join the Company to tell this beloved story with its grand adventures taken by Clara and Hans.

    The Nutcracker brings the holiday spirit into focus, transporting you through Clara's dreams and the wondrous characters she encounters along the way. With the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Cavalier as guides, you'll fly away to the Snow Kingdom and the Land of the Sweets, but not before battling the Mouse King and his pirate henchmice.

    Toni Pimble's exquisite choreography and Don Carson's colorful and magical sets are masterfully orchestrated to create the perfect tradition for everyone on your holiday list.

  • Sat, Nov 29th 2:00pm - 5:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    The Festival of Trees, an extravagant holiday display benefiting the Military Heritage Museum, will be a two day event.  On Saturday the display will be open to the public from from 2 to 5 p.m. Admission will be $1 for adults and kids are free.  Of course larger donations would be accepted and all money raised will benefit the museum!  There will be 25 large trees and 10 tabletop trees available for purchase or on a “buy it now” price.

    Day two will be a ticketed event on Sunday from 4 to 6 p.m. with appetizers and champagne. There will be up to seven “trees of giving” that will be live auctioned by former Mayor Phil Brubaker.  Each tree will be sponsored by one of the event's major sponsors who will be decorating the tree, as well as providing gifts to go under the tree. The gifts under the tree will go to the charity of the buyer's choice, and the tree can be kept by the buyer or given to the charity. Teams of buyers are welcome to join forces to purchase one of these trees.

    There is a rumor in the air that the elves and Santa from the Holly Jolly Follies will be in attendance!

  • Sun, Nov 30th 4:00pm - 6:00pm
    City of Florence Oregon Official Website

    The Festival of Trees, an extravagant holiday display benefiting the Military Heritage Museum, will be a two day event.  On Saturday the display will be open to the public from from 2 to 5 p.m. Admission will be $1 for adults and kids are free.  Of course larger donations would be accepted and all money raised will benefit the museum!  There will be 25 large trees and 10 tabletop trees available for purchase or on a “buy it now” price.

    Day two will be a ticketed event on Sunday from 4 to 6 p.m. with appetizers and champagne. There will be up to seven “trees of giving” that will be live auctioned by former Mayor Phil Brubaker.  Each tree will be sponsored by one of the event's major sponsors who will be decorating the tree, as well as providing gifts to go under the tree. The gifts under the tree will go to the charity of the buyer's choice, and the tree can be kept by the buyer or given to the charity. Teams of buyers are welcome to join forces to purchase one of these trees.

    There is a rumor in the air that the elves and Santa from the Holly Jolly Follies will be in attendance!